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Upcoming Events

January 01, 2020 12:00 — December 31, 2021 12:00   ·   various

NZ Composer Sessions 2021 | APPLY NOW

Opportunity

The applications are now open for the NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa 2021, closing on 22 February 2021.

The NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa is a collaboration between the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, RNZ Concert and SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music.

The aim is to create high-quality NZ orchestral recordings and to promote the works to a range of orchestras and broadcasters.

Following the concert and the final editing process, the recordings will be available as audio on SOUNZ’s and RNZ Concert’s websites.

The 2021 recordings will take place over four days (28 Sep – 1 Oct) at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington.

Download more information and the application form here.

Download the NZSO Score and Parts Preparation Guidelines here.

This key SOUNZ project, delivered in partnership with the NZSO and RNZ Concert, was established in 1998 and was rebranded as NZ Composer Sessions in 2016. It produces new recordings of orchestral music for public broadcast and online streaming. 



Read more about the past recordings on SOUNZ online, where you can also find links to previous recordings and background information about composers whose works have been selected for the project.

The applications are now open for the NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa 2021, closing on 22 February 2021.

The NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa is a collaboration between the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, RNZ Concert and SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music.

The aim is to create high-quality NZ orchestral recordings and to promote the works to a range of orchestras and broadcasters.

Following the concert and the final editing process, the recordings will be available as audio on SOUNZ’s and RNZ Concert’s websites.

The 2021 recordings will take place over four days (28 Sep – 1 Oct) at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington.

Download more information and the application form here.

Download the NZSO Score and Parts Preparation Guidelines here.

This key SOUNZ project, delivered in partnership with the NZSO and RNZ Concert, was established in 1998 and was rebranded as NZ Composer Sessions in 2016. It produces new recordings of orchestral music for public broadcast and online streaming. 



Read more about the past recordings on SOUNZ online, where you can also find links to previous recordings and background information about composers whose works have been selected for the project.

The applications are now open for the NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa 2021, closing on 22 February 2021.

The NZ Composer Sessions | Ngā Huihuinga Hāpai i ngā Kaitito o Aotearoa is a collaboration between the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, RNZ Concert and SOUNZ Centre for New Zealand Music.

The aim is to create high-quality NZ orchestral recordings and to promote the works to a range of orchestras and broadcasters.

Following the concert and the final editing process, the recordings will be available as audio on SOUNZ’s and RNZ Concert’s websites.

The 2021 recordings will take place over four days (28 Sep – 1 Oct) at the Michael Fowler Centre in Wellington.

Download more information and the application form here.

Download the NZSO Score and Parts Preparation Guidelines here.

This key SOUNZ project, delivered in partnership with the NZSO and RNZ Concert, was established in 1998 and was rebranded as NZ Composer Sessions in 2016. It produces new recordings of orchestral music for public broadcast and online streaming. 



Read more about the past recordings on SOUNZ online, where you can also find links to previous recordings and background information about composers whose works have been selected for the project.

October 19, 2020 09:00 — February 22, 2021 09:00

Australian and New Zealand Viola Society | 2021 Composition Competition

Opportunity

"Once you become a viola-player, one of your most important duties is to strive to enlarge the library of solo viola music"

— Lionel Tertis —


Writing new music for viola?

After three previous successful Viola Composition Competitions run by ANZVS, another one will be held in Winter 2021.

There is now a new category in the competition this year: compositions will be accepted for viola plus voice or viola plus one other instrument, for the first time.


Click here for the entry form and Conditions of Entry.

For further enquiries about the competition or the Australian and New Zealand Viola Society, contact secretary@anzvs.com.


"Once you become a viola-player, one of your most important duties is to strive to enlarge the library of solo viola music"

— Lionel Tertis —


Writing new music for viola?

After three previous successful Viola Composition Competitions run by ANZVS, another one will be held in Winter 2021.

There is now a new category in the competition this year: compositions will be accepted for viola plus voice or viola plus one other instrument, for the first time.


Click here for the entry form and Conditions of Entry.

For further enquiries about the competition or the Australian and New Zealand Viola Society, contact secretary@anzvs.com.


October 27, 2020 09:00 — May 01, 2021 17:00

Yarra Valley Opera Festival 2020 presents Ross James Carey's 'Kate Kelly'

Screening

Now available to stream through November 30th!


The Kate Kelly Song Cycle (Kate Kelly), is a chamber opera in five scenes for three soloists, unison chorus, and a small instrumental ensemble. A creative collaboration by composer Ross James Carey and Australian writer Merrill Findlay, Kate Kelly re-interprets the life of one of Australia’s most iconic women, the youngest sister of bushranger Ned Kelly.

The chamber opera emerged from Merrill’s Kate Kelly Project. It was first performed in Forbes (central-west N.S.W.) in September 2011, as the headline act for inaugural Kalari-Lachlan River Arts Festival, beside the lagoon in which Kate Kelly’s body was found in 1898.

Kate Kelly, the sister of bushranger Ned, is a folk hero, an icon, a legend in Australia. She was born in Victoria in 1863, and, by 1880, the year Ned was captured at Glenrowan, was a household name, a teenage celebrity as famous (or infamous) as the celebrities we read about it the populist press today. People queued to meet her and to watch her ride. They bought postcards of her in her mourning outfit, a fashionable black silk riding habit.

And then she disappeared. She fled her fame, her family, her friends, the north-eastern Victorian hill country she had grown up in. She changed her name several times, and re-emerged, in the mid-1880s, on the flat inland plains of New South Wales between the towns of Forbes and Condobolin, where she found a job as a domestic servant at Cadow, a large pastoral station on the Lachlan River.

One or two years later Kate Kelly moved into Forbes and worked as a home-help for several well respected business families—but she always kept her past to herself. She made friends, went out with a couple of local lads, found one who, like her, loved horses, got pregnant, married him, had more babies, lost at least three … and then she disappeared again. She allegedly told a neighbour, Susan Hurley, that “she wanted to go away for a couple of days to get straight” and asked her to look after her four surviving children, including her newborn baby. More than a week later her body was found in the lagoon. It had been in the water for many days. The coroner concluded that she “was found drowned … but there was no evidence to show how deceased got into the water.”

There is little documentary evidence about Kate Kelly’s life and death in Forbes, yet the folklore about her remains tantalisingly rich and alive. Everyone, it seems, has a story to tell about our Kate or, if not about Kate herself, then about her husband William Foster, or Bricky, as he was also known. Bricky outlived his wife by more than forty years, and is remembered by old timers as a man who could never avoid a fight. Circumstantial evidence confirms the hearsay: that Kate endured years of violent abuse in her marriage. She almost certainly also suffered from conditions doctors would now diagnose as anxiety, depression (probably including peri-natal depression), post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Neither Kate, nor the community she lived in, would have been able to recognise or appropriately treat these illnesses, however.

This work not only honours Kate Kelly herself, but also foregrounds the challenges women of all backgrounds have faced in inland rural Australia. It also acknowledges the diverse cultures of the people who have lived along the Lachlan River for the last forty thousand years or more. The music and lyrics reference many of these peoples, including the Wiradjuri nation, the different groups of Europeans who settled in and around Forbes in the nineteenth century, and the town’s many Cantonese migrants. And, of course, Kate Kelly’s own Irish ancestors — Merrill Findlay

Now available to stream through November 30th!


The Kate Kelly Song Cycle (Kate Kelly), is a chamber opera in five scenes for three soloists, unison chorus, and a small instrumental ensemble. A creative collaboration by composer Ross James Carey and Australian writer Merrill Findlay, Kate Kelly re-interprets the life of one of Australia’s most iconic women, the youngest sister of bushranger Ned Kelly.

The chamber opera emerged from Merrill’s Kate Kelly Project. It was first performed in Forbes (central-west N.S.W.) in September 2011, as the headline act for inaugural Kalari-Lachlan River Arts Festival, beside the lagoon in which Kate Kelly’s body was found in 1898.

Kate Kelly, the sister of bushranger Ned, is a folk hero, an icon, a legend in Australia. She was born in Victoria in 1863, and, by 1880, the year Ned was captured at Glenrowan, was a household name, a teenage celebrity as famous (or infamous) as the celebrities we read about it the populist press today. People queued to meet her and to watch her ride. They bought postcards of her in her mourning outfit, a fashionable black silk riding habit.

And then she disappeared. She fled her fame, her family, her friends, the north-eastern Victorian hill country she had grown up in. She changed her name several times, and re-emerged, in the mid-1880s, on the flat inland plains of New South Wales between the towns of Forbes and Condobolin, where she found a job as a domestic servant at Cadow, a large pastoral station on the Lachlan River.

One or two years later Kate Kelly moved into Forbes and worked as a home-help for several well respected business families—but she always kept her past to herself. She made friends, went out with a couple of local lads, found one who, like her, loved horses, got pregnant, married him, had more babies, lost at least three … and then she disappeared again. She allegedly told a neighbour, Susan Hurley, that “she wanted to go away for a couple of days to get straight” and asked her to look after her four surviving children, including her newborn baby. More than a week later her body was found in the lagoon. It had been in the water for many days. The coroner concluded that she “was found drowned … but there was no evidence to show how deceased got into the water.”

There is little documentary evidence about Kate Kelly’s life and death in Forbes, yet the folklore about her remains tantalisingly rich and alive. Everyone, it seems, has a story to tell about our Kate or, if not about Kate herself, then about her husband William Foster, or Bricky, as he was also known. Bricky outlived his wife by more than forty years, and is remembered by old timers as a man who could never avoid a fight. Circumstantial evidence confirms the hearsay: that Kate endured years of violent abuse in her marriage. She almost certainly also suffered from conditions doctors would now diagnose as anxiety, depression (probably including peri-natal depression), post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Neither Kate, nor the community she lived in, would have been able to recognise or appropriately treat these illnesses, however.

This work not only honours Kate Kelly herself, but also foregrounds the challenges women of all backgrounds have faced in inland rural Australia. It also acknowledges the diverse cultures of the people who have lived along the Lachlan River for the last forty thousand years or more. The music and lyrics reference many of these peoples, including the Wiradjuri nation, the different groups of Europeans who settled in and around Forbes in the nineteenth century, and the town’s many Cantonese migrants. And, of course, Kate Kelly’s own Irish ancestors — Merrill Findlay

Now available to stream through November 30th!


The Kate Kelly Song Cycle (Kate Kelly), is a chamber opera in five scenes for three soloists, unison chorus, and a small instrumental ensemble. A creative collaboration by composer Ross James Carey and Australian writer Merrill Findlay, Kate Kelly re-interprets the life of one of Australia’s most iconic women, the youngest sister of bushranger Ned Kelly.

The chamber opera emerged from Merrill’s Kate Kelly Project. It was first performed in Forbes (central-west N.S.W.) in September 2011, as the headline act for inaugural Kalari-Lachlan River Arts Festival, beside the lagoon in which Kate Kelly’s body was found in 1898.

Kate Kelly, the sister of bushranger Ned, is a folk hero, an icon, a legend in Australia. She was born in Victoria in 1863, and, by 1880, the year Ned was captured at Glenrowan, was a household name, a teenage celebrity as famous (or infamous) as the celebrities we read about it the populist press today. People queued to meet her and to watch her ride. They bought postcards of her in her mourning outfit, a fashionable black silk riding habit.

And then she disappeared. She fled her fame, her family, her friends, the north-eastern Victorian hill country she had grown up in. She changed her name several times, and re-emerged, in the mid-1880s, on the flat inland plains of New South Wales between the towns of Forbes and Condobolin, where she found a job as a domestic servant at Cadow, a large pastoral station on the Lachlan River.

One or two years later Kate Kelly moved into Forbes and worked as a home-help for several well respected business families—but she always kept her past to herself. She made friends, went out with a couple of local lads, found one who, like her, loved horses, got pregnant, married him, had more babies, lost at least three … and then she disappeared again. She allegedly told a neighbour, Susan Hurley, that “she wanted to go away for a couple of days to get straight” and asked her to look after her four surviving children, including her newborn baby. More than a week later her body was found in the lagoon. It had been in the water for many days. The coroner concluded that she “was found drowned … but there was no evidence to show how deceased got into the water.”

There is little documentary evidence about Kate Kelly’s life and death in Forbes, yet the folklore about her remains tantalisingly rich and alive. Everyone, it seems, has a story to tell about our Kate or, if not about Kate herself, then about her husband William Foster, or Bricky, as he was also known. Bricky outlived his wife by more than forty years, and is remembered by old timers as a man who could never avoid a fight. Circumstantial evidence confirms the hearsay: that Kate endured years of violent abuse in her marriage. She almost certainly also suffered from conditions doctors would now diagnose as anxiety, depression (probably including peri-natal depression), post-traumatic stress and substance abuse. Neither Kate, nor the community she lived in, would have been able to recognise or appropriately treat these illnesses, however.

This work not only honours Kate Kelly herself, but also foregrounds the challenges women of all backgrounds have faced in inland rural Australia. It also acknowledges the diverse cultures of the people who have lived along the Lachlan River for the last forty thousand years or more. The music and lyrics reference many of these peoples, including the Wiradjuri nation, the different groups of Europeans who settled in and around Forbes in the nineteenth century, and the town’s many Cantonese migrants. And, of course, Kate Kelly’s own Irish ancestors — Merrill Findlay

November 09, 2020 09:00 — November 30, 2020 23:59   ·   Gertrude Opera Yarra Valley Opera Festival 2020 (live-stream online delivery)

SOUNZ Kaitito Kaipuoro Wānanga | Composer Workshop

Workshop

Our next wānanga is for composers of all genres who are interested in understanding and working with Taonga Puoro.

The day will include a discussion of the composition Ko te tātai whetū with co-composers Phil Brownlee and Ariana Tikao; a panel discussion with Taonga Puoro experts Tamihana Katene, Jerome Kavanagh, Ariana Tikao, Te Kahureremoa Taumata, Alistair Fraser and Ruby Solly; and a presentation of Oro Atua – a Māori Sound Healing Journey by Jerome Kavanagh.

The wānanga will take place on Saturday, 28 November from 9.30am to 5.00pm in the Upper Chamber at Toi Pōneke Arts Centre — Level 1, 61 Abel Smith Street, Wellington.

More details, including registration information, to follow...

Our next wānanga is for composers of all genres who are interested in understanding and working with Taonga Puoro.

The day will include a discussion of the composition Ko te tātai whetū with co-composers Phil Brownlee and Ariana Tikao; a panel discussion with Taonga Puoro experts Tamihana Katene, Jerome Kavanagh, Ariana Tikao, Te Kahureremoa Taumata, Alistair Fraser and Ruby Solly; and a presentation of Oro Atua – a Māori Sound Healing Journey by Jerome Kavanagh.

The wānanga will take place on Saturday, 28 November from 9.30am to 5.00pm in the Upper Chamber at Toi Pōneke Arts Centre — Level 1, 61 Abel Smith Street, Wellington.

More details, including registration information, to follow...

Our next wānanga is for composers of all genres who are interested in understanding and working with Taonga Puoro.

The day will include a discussion of the composition Ko te tātai whetū with co-composers Phil Brownlee and Ariana Tikao; a panel discussion with Taonga Puoro experts Tamihana Katene, Jerome Kavanagh, Ariana Tikao, Te Kahureremoa Taumata, Alistair Fraser and Ruby Solly; and a presentation of Oro Atua – a Māori Sound Healing Journey by Jerome Kavanagh.

The wānanga will take place on Saturday, 28 November from 9.30am to 5.00pm in the Upper Chamber at Toi Pōneke Arts Centre — Level 1, 61 Abel Smith Street, Wellington.

More details, including registration information, to follow...

November 28, 2020 09:30 — November 28, 2020 17:00   ·   Upper Chamber at Toi Pōneke Arts Centre, Wellington

Daniel Beban | Daily Deaths – Tracing the Global Pandemic in Sound

Concert

Daily Deaths is a new musical work by Daniel Beban that literally allows audiences to experience the unfolding days, weeks and months of the Covid19 pandemic in sound.

The piece directly translates Covid19 statistics from different countries into a musical score performed by a large ensemble of 18 musicians. Different country’s daily death rates are translated into musical notes – the higher the death rate the higher in pitch the musical note… trumpets play Iran, double basses play China, flutes play Brazil, cellos play India and so on. Because the pandemic is an ongoing situation, the piece is continually growing.

Featuring an 18 piece ensemble of woodwinds, brass and strings, the concert will take place in the awe-inspiring acoustics of Futuna Chapel, an icon of New Zealand avant garde architecture.

Chapel open for viewing at 2pm, concert starts 2:30pm.

The 18-piece ensemble features Gerard Crewdson and Dan Yeabsley (tuba), Nell Thomas and Rachelle Eastwood (flute), Aiko Sato and Gareth Thompson (trombone), Jake Baxendale and Glen Downie (alto sax), Bridget Kelly and Blair Latham (bass clarinet), James Guilford-Smith and Stephen Roche (trumpet), Tristan Carter and Chris Prosser (violin), Charlie Davenport and Erika Grant (cello), Patrick Bleakley and Isaac Smith (double bass).


Daily Deaths is a new musical work by Daniel Beban that literally allows audiences to experience the unfolding days, weeks and months of the Covid19 pandemic in sound.

The piece directly translates Covid19 statistics from different countries into a musical score performed by a large ensemble of 18 musicians. Different country’s daily death rates are translated into musical notes – the higher the death rate the higher in pitch the musical note… trumpets play Iran, double basses play China, flutes play Brazil, cellos play India and so on. Because the pandemic is an ongoing situation, the piece is continually growing.

Featuring an 18 piece ensemble of woodwinds, brass and strings, the concert will take place in the awe-inspiring acoustics of Futuna Chapel, an icon of New Zealand avant garde architecture.

Chapel open for viewing at 2pm, concert starts 2:30pm.

The 18-piece ensemble features Gerard Crewdson and Dan Yeabsley (tuba), Nell Thomas and Rachelle Eastwood (flute), Aiko Sato and Gareth Thompson (trombone), Jake Baxendale and Glen Downie (alto sax), Bridget Kelly and Blair Latham (bass clarinet), James Guilford-Smith and Stephen Roche (trumpet), Tristan Carter and Chris Prosser (violin), Charlie Davenport and Erika Grant (cello), Patrick Bleakley and Isaac Smith (double bass).


Daily Deaths is a new musical work by Daniel Beban that literally allows audiences to experience the unfolding days, weeks and months of the Covid19 pandemic in sound.

The piece directly translates Covid19 statistics from different countries into a musical score performed by a large ensemble of 18 musicians. Different country’s daily death rates are translated into musical notes – the higher the death rate the higher in pitch the musical note… trumpets play Iran, double basses play China, flutes play Brazil, cellos play India and so on. Because the pandemic is an ongoing situation, the piece is continually growing.

Featuring an 18 piece ensemble of woodwinds, brass and strings, the concert will take place in the awe-inspiring acoustics of Futuna Chapel, an icon of New Zealand avant garde architecture.

Chapel open for viewing at 2pm, concert starts 2:30pm.

The 18-piece ensemble features Gerard Crewdson and Dan Yeabsley (tuba), Nell Thomas and Rachelle Eastwood (flute), Aiko Sato and Gareth Thompson (trombone), Jake Baxendale and Glen Downie (alto sax), Bridget Kelly and Blair Latham (bass clarinet), James Guilford-Smith and Stephen Roche (trumpet), Tristan Carter and Chris Prosser (violin), Charlie Davenport and Erika Grant (cello), Patrick Bleakley and Isaac Smith (double bass).


December 05, 2020 14:00 — December 05, 2020 16:00   ·   Futuna Chapel, Wellington

Constellations | NZTrio in Gisborne

Concert

Beethoven | Piano Trio No. 1
Saariaho | Light and Matter
Margetić | Lightbox
Korngold | Piano Trio


As the date of Beethoven’s 250th birthday approaches, we open this concert where it all began: his seminal Opus 1 No 1. Then our focus fans out to the Finnish-German-French influence in Kaija Saariaho’s spectral masterpiece Light and Matter. Staying in the brightest light, we experience the delightful return of the prizewinning Lightbox by New Zealander Karlo Margetić. The light then projects onto the silver screen in the Piano Trio by Erich Korngold, a work that bears all the hallmarks of his Austro-Hungarian upbringing, WW2-era immigration into America and film-music career.


Full downloadable programme notes here


Additional performances:

Thursday, 10 December — Mairangi Arts Centre, Auckland
Friday, 11 December — Auckland Town Hall


Beethoven | Piano Trio No. 1
Saariaho | Light and Matter
Margetić | Lightbox
Korngold | Piano Trio


As the date of Beethoven’s 250th birthday approaches, we open this concert where it all began: his seminal Opus 1 No 1. Then our focus fans out to the Finnish-German-French influence in Kaija Saariaho’s spectral masterpiece Light and Matter. Staying in the brightest light, we experience the delightful return of the prizewinning Lightbox by New Zealander Karlo Margetić. The light then projects onto the silver screen in the Piano Trio by Erich Korngold, a work that bears all the hallmarks of his Austro-Hungarian upbringing, WW2-era immigration into America and film-music career.


Full downloadable programme notes here


Additional performances:

Thursday, 10 December — Mairangi Arts Centre, Auckland
Friday, 11 December — Auckland Town Hall


December 08, 2020 19:00 — December 08, 2020 21:00   ·   Tiromoana Estate, Gisborne

Woodwind at the Pah, with Camille Wells and friends

Concert

Camille Wells | oboe
Melanie Lançon | flute
Ingrid Hagan | bassoon
Chen Cao | cello
Sarah Watkins | piano


Oboist Camille Wells leads her APO colleagues and much-loved pianist Sarah Watkins in a selection of chamber works guaranteed to charm and delight.

The programme opens with a short but powerful world première by Ben Hoadley. Commissioned by Camille Wells and her student Shaiq Ahmad Noori in Afghanistan, Invocation is inspired by a mournful Afghan love song.

In Four Personalities, American composer Alyssa Morris brilliantly and playfully creates musical depictions of personality types we all recognise. Which of your friends does each short movement bring to mind?

Corigliano composed The Food of Love to celebrate the fiftieth wedding anniversary of his dear friends Michèle and Larry Corash. The Food of Love is a duet for oboe and cello which depicts the sweetness and strife of a marriage.

Relax into the gorgeous, tender melodies of Madeleine Dring’s Trio for Flute, Oboe, and Piano. Dring composed the Trio for Flute, Oboe, and Piano (1968) for her husband Roger Lord, an oboist who played with the London Symphony Orchestra. Described as “somewhat of a monk and somewhat of a rascal”, Francis Poulenc wrote his cheeky, colourful Trio for Oboe, Bassoon, and Piano in 1926. The work features a lyrical second movement which Poulenc described as “sweet and melancholic”, and ends with a joyful rondo that will send you home fizzing.


Camille Wells | oboe
Melanie Lançon | flute
Ingrid Hagan | bassoon
Chen Cao | cello
Sarah Watkins | piano


Oboist Camille Wells leads her APO colleagues and much-loved pianist Sarah Watkins in a selection of chamber works guaranteed to charm and delight.

The programme opens with a short but powerful world première by Ben Hoadley. Commissioned by Camille Wells and her student Shaiq Ahmad Noori in Afghanistan, Invocation is inspired by a mournful Afghan love song.

In Four Personalities, American composer Alyssa Morris brilliantly and playfully creates musical depictions of personality types we all recognise. Which of your friends does each short movement bring to mind?

Corigliano composed The Food of Love to celebrate the fiftieth wedding anniversary of his dear friends Michèle and Larry Corash. The Food of Love is a duet for oboe and cello which depicts the sweetness and strife of a marriage.

Relax into the gorgeous, tender melodies of Madeleine Dring’s Trio for Flute, Oboe, and Piano. Dring composed the Trio for Flute, Oboe, and Piano (1968) for her husband Roger Lord, an oboist who played with the London Symphony Orchestra. Described as “somewhat of a monk and somewhat of a rascal”, Francis Poulenc wrote his cheeky, colourful Trio for Oboe, Bassoon, and Piano in 1926. The work features a lyrical second movement which Poulenc described as “sweet and melancholic”, and ends with a joyful rondo that will send you home fizzing.


Camille Wells | oboe
Melanie Lançon | flute
Ingrid Hagan | bassoon
Chen Cao | cello
Sarah Watkins | piano


Oboist Camille Wells leads her APO colleagues and much-loved pianist Sarah Watkins in a selection of chamber works guaranteed to charm and delight.

The programme opens with a short but powerful world première by Ben Hoadley. Commissioned by Camille Wells and her student Shaiq Ahmad Noori in Afghanistan, Invocation is inspired by a mournful Afghan love song.

In Four Personalities, American composer Alyssa Morris brilliantly and playfully creates musical depictions of personality types we all recognise. Which of your friends does each short movement bring to mind?

Corigliano composed The Food of Love to celebrate the fiftieth wedding anniversary of his dear friends Michèle and Larry Corash. The Food of Love is a duet for oboe and cello which depicts the sweetness and strife of a marriage.

Relax into the gorgeous, tender melodies of Madeleine Dring’s Trio for Flute, Oboe, and Piano. Dring composed the Trio for Flute, Oboe, and Piano (1968) for her husband Roger Lord, an oboist who played with the London Symphony Orchestra. Described as “somewhat of a monk and somewhat of a rascal”, Francis Poulenc wrote his cheeky, colourful Trio for Oboe, Bassoon, and Piano in 1926. The work features a lyrical second movement which Poulenc described as “sweet and melancholic”, and ends with a joyful rondo that will send you home fizzing.


December 08, 2020 19:30   ·   The Wallace Arts Centre, Pah Homestead, Auckland

Constellations | NZTrio at Mairangi Arts Centre

Concert

Beethoven | Piano Trio No. 1 (1st mvt)
Saariaho | Light and Matter
Margetić | Lightbox
Korngold | Piano Trio (1st mvt)


As the date of Beethoven’s 250th birthday approaches, we open this concert where it all began: his seminal Opus 1 No 1. Then our focus fans out to the Finnish-German-French influence in Kaija Saariaho’s spectral masterpiece Light and Matter. Staying in the brightest light, we experience the delightful return of the prizewinning Lightbox by New Zealander Karlo Margetić. The light then projects onto the silver screen in the Piano Trio by Erich Korngold, a work that bears all the hallmarks of his Austro-Hungarian upbringing, WW2-era immigration into America and film-music career.


Full downloadable programme notes here


Additional performances:

Tuesday, 8 December — Tiromoana Estate, Gisborne
Friday, 11 December — Auckland Town Hall


Beethoven | Piano Trio No. 1 (1st mvt)
Saariaho | Light and Matter
Margetić | Lightbox
Korngold | Piano Trio (1st mvt)


As the date of Beethoven’s 250th birthday approaches, we open this concert where it all began: his seminal Opus 1 No 1. Then our focus fans out to the Finnish-German-French influence in Kaija Saariaho’s spectral masterpiece Light and Matter. Staying in the brightest light, we experience the delightful return of the prizewinning Lightbox by New Zealander Karlo Margetić. The light then projects onto the silver screen in the Piano Trio by Erich Korngold, a work that bears all the hallmarks of his Austro-Hungarian upbringing, WW2-era immigration into America and film-music career.


Full downloadable programme notes here


Additional performances:

Tuesday, 8 December — Tiromoana Estate, Gisborne
Friday, 11 December — Auckland Town Hall


December 10, 2020 19:00 — December 10, 2020 20:00   ·   Mairangi Arts Centre, Auckland

Constellations | NZTrio at Auckland Town Hall

Concert

Beethoven | Piano Trio No. 1
Saariaho | Light and Matter
Margetić | Lightbox
Korngold | Piano Trio


As the date of Beethoven’s 250th birthday approaches, we open this concert where it all began: his seminal Opus 1 No 1. Then our focus fans out to the Finnish-German-French influence in Kaija Saariaho’s spectral masterpiece Light and Matter. Staying in the brightest light, we experience the delightful return of the prizewinning Lightbox by New Zealander Karlo Margetić. The light then projects onto the silver screen in the Piano Trio by Erich Korngold, a work that bears all the hallmarks of his Austro-Hungarian upbringing, WW2-era immigration into America and film-music career.


Full downloadable programme notes here


Additional performances:

Tuesday, 8 December — Tiromoana Estate, Gisborne
Thursday, 10 December — Mairangi Arts Centre, Auckland


Beethoven | Piano Trio No. 1
Saariaho | Light and Matter
Margetić | Lightbox
Korngold | Piano Trio


As the date of Beethoven’s 250th birthday approaches, we open this concert where it all began: his seminal Opus 1 No 1. Then our focus fans out to the Finnish-German-French influence in Kaija Saariaho’s spectral masterpiece Light and Matter. Staying in the brightest light, we experience the delightful return of the prizewinning Lightbox by New Zealander Karlo Margetić. The light then projects onto the silver screen in the Piano Trio by Erich Korngold, a work that bears all the hallmarks of his Austro-Hungarian upbringing, WW2-era immigration into America and film-music career.


Full downloadable programme notes here


Additional performances:

Tuesday, 8 December — Tiromoana Estate, Gisborne
Thursday, 10 December — Mairangi Arts Centre, Auckland


December 11, 2020 20:00 — December 11, 2020 22:00   ·   Auckland Town Hall Concert Chamber

NZ Secondary Students' Choir 2019-20 FAREWELL TOUR – AUCKLAND WITH SIMON O’NEILL

Concert

Also in Wellington on December 18th.

After a tough year which saw many of our events cancelled, including our international tour, we are incredibly excited that the 2019-2020 choir can come together one last time to present a week of concerts in Auckland and Wellington.

Join us for our favourite music from the last couple of years – including David N. Childs, Dan Davidson, Michael McGlynn, Stephen Rapana – as well as a few Christmas jingles for the festive season!

“The audience was enthralled and totally absorbed in everything they heard and saw, from start to finish. … Little wonder that the audience was on its feet at the end in a prolonged standing ovation in appreciation of a superb concert where all the singers continually projected the pleasure they gained from singing and sharing this with an appreciative audience.” – Hawkes Bay Today, 2018

Get your tickets, we’ll see you there!

For this concert only we will be joined by world-renowned Heldentenor and NZSSC alumnus Simon O’Neill!

A native of Ashburton Simon began his singing career as 1st bass in the NZ Secondary Students Choir. He is now recognised as one of the finest Helden-tenors on the planet. He has appeared at the Metropolitan Opera, the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Teatro alla Scala, Berlin, Munich and Vienna Staatsoper, Carnegie Hall, the BBC Proms and the Edinburgh, Salzburg and Bayreuth Festivals.

Also in Wellington on December 18th.

After a tough year which saw many of our events cancelled, including our international tour, we are incredibly excited that the 2019-2020 choir can come together one last time to present a week of concerts in Auckland and Wellington.

Join us for our favourite music from the last couple of years – including David N. Childs, Dan Davidson, Michael McGlynn, Stephen Rapana – as well as a few Christmas jingles for the festive season!

“The audience was enthralled and totally absorbed in everything they heard and saw, from start to finish. … Little wonder that the audience was on its feet at the end in a prolonged standing ovation in appreciation of a superb concert where all the singers continually projected the pleasure they gained from singing and sharing this with an appreciative audience.” – Hawkes Bay Today, 2018

Get your tickets, we’ll see you there!

For this concert only we will be joined by world-renowned Heldentenor and NZSSC alumnus Simon O’Neill!

A native of Ashburton Simon began his singing career as 1st bass in the NZ Secondary Students Choir. He is now recognised as one of the finest Helden-tenors on the planet. He has appeared at the Metropolitan Opera, the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Teatro alla Scala, Berlin, Munich and Vienna Staatsoper, Carnegie Hall, the BBC Proms and the Edinburgh, Salzburg and Bayreuth Festivals.

Also in Wellington on December 18th.

After a tough year which saw many of our events cancelled, including our international tour, we are incredibly excited that the 2019-2020 choir can come together one last time to present a week of concerts in Auckland and Wellington.

Join us for our favourite music from the last couple of years – including David N. Childs, Dan Davidson, Michael McGlynn, Stephen Rapana – as well as a few Christmas jingles for the festive season!

“The audience was enthralled and totally absorbed in everything they heard and saw, from start to finish. … Little wonder that the audience was on its feet at the end in a prolonged standing ovation in appreciation of a superb concert where all the singers continually projected the pleasure they gained from singing and sharing this with an appreciative audience.” – Hawkes Bay Today, 2018

Get your tickets, we’ll see you there!

For this concert only we will be joined by world-renowned Heldentenor and NZSSC alumnus Simon O’Neill!

A native of Ashburton Simon began his singing career as 1st bass in the NZ Secondary Students Choir. He is now recognised as one of the finest Helden-tenors on the planet. He has appeared at the Metropolitan Opera, the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Teatro alla Scala, Berlin, Munich and Vienna Staatsoper, Carnegie Hall, the BBC Proms and the Edinburgh, Salzburg and Bayreuth Festivals.

December 16, 2020 19:30 — December 16, 2020 21:00   ·   ST MATTHEWS IN THE CITY, AUCKLAND

NZ Secondary Students' Choir 2019-20 FAREWELL TOUR – WELLINGTON

Concert

Also in Auckland on December 16th.

After a tough year which saw many of our events cancelled, including our international tour, we are incredibly excited that the 2019-2020 choir can come together one last time to present a week of concerts in Auckland and Wellington.

Join us for our favourite music from the last couple of years – including David N. Childs, Dan Davidson, Michael McGlynn, Stephen Rapana – as well as a few Christmas jingles for the festive season!

“The audience was enthralled and totally absorbed in everything they heard and saw, from start to finish. … Little wonder that the audience was on its feet at the end in a prolonged standing ovation in appreciation of a superb concert where all the singers continually projected the pleasure they gained from singing and sharing this with an appreciative audience.” - Hawkes Bay Today, 2018

Get your tickets, we’ll see you there!

Also in Auckland on December 16th.

After a tough year which saw many of our events cancelled, including our international tour, we are incredibly excited that the 2019-2020 choir can come together one last time to present a week of concerts in Auckland and Wellington.

Join us for our favourite music from the last couple of years – including David N. Childs, Dan Davidson, Michael McGlynn, Stephen Rapana – as well as a few Christmas jingles for the festive season!

“The audience was enthralled and totally absorbed in everything they heard and saw, from start to finish. … Little wonder that the audience was on its feet at the end in a prolonged standing ovation in appreciation of a superb concert where all the singers continually projected the pleasure they gained from singing and sharing this with an appreciative audience.” - Hawkes Bay Today, 2018

Get your tickets, we’ll see you there!

Also in Auckland on December 16th.

After a tough year which saw many of our events cancelled, including our international tour, we are incredibly excited that the 2019-2020 choir can come together one last time to present a week of concerts in Auckland and Wellington.

Join us for our favourite music from the last couple of years – including David N. Childs, Dan Davidson, Michael McGlynn, Stephen Rapana – as well as a few Christmas jingles for the festive season!

“The audience was enthralled and totally absorbed in everything they heard and saw, from start to finish. … Little wonder that the audience was on its feet at the end in a prolonged standing ovation in appreciation of a superb concert where all the singers continually projected the pleasure they gained from singing and sharing this with an appreciative audience.” - Hawkes Bay Today, 2018

Get your tickets, we’ll see you there!

December 18, 2020 19:30 — December 18, 2020 21:00   ·   LOWER HUTT TOWN HALL

Christchurch Symphony Orchestra | Tūmahana: Exchange

Concert

Juanita Hepi | artistic director
Danny Syme | co-director/head trainer
Hamish Oliver | composer


Tūmahana: Exchange is a bilingual (Te Reo Māori and English) performance that offers a glimpse into a past where generations of our tīpuna and ancestors have made their homes in and around the Ngāi Tahu takiwā of Te Waipounamu.

This all ages performance weaves theatre, aerial and visual arts, acrobatics, Toi Māori and Tāonga Pūoro with orchestral music in collaboration with Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, Christchurch Circus Collective and CSO.


Juanita Hepi | artistic director
Danny Syme | co-director/head trainer
Hamish Oliver | composer


Tūmahana: Exchange is a bilingual (Te Reo Māori and English) performance that offers a glimpse into a past where generations of our tīpuna and ancestors have made their homes in and around the Ngāi Tahu takiwā of Te Waipounamu.

This all ages performance weaves theatre, aerial and visual arts, acrobatics, Toi Māori and Tāonga Pūoro with orchestral music in collaboration with Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, Christchurch Circus Collective and CSO.


Juanita Hepi | artistic director
Danny Syme | co-director/head trainer
Hamish Oliver | composer


Tūmahana: Exchange is a bilingual (Te Reo Māori and English) performance that offers a glimpse into a past where generations of our tīpuna and ancestors have made their homes in and around the Ngāi Tahu takiwā of Te Waipounamu.

This all ages performance weaves theatre, aerial and visual arts, acrobatics, Toi Māori and Tāonga Pūoro with orchestral music in collaboration with Te Hapū o Ngāti Wheke, Christchurch Circus Collective and CSO.


March 27, 2021 19:30   ·   Douglas Lilburn Auditorium, Christchurch
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